WARSAW, Poland — A Polish civilian was killed and one injured in a car accident involving a convoy of four US Army vehicles currently in Poland for the country's largest military exercise, the service has confirmed.

The incident occurred at 11:30 p.m. local time Tuesday.

Lt. Gen. Ben Hodges, the US Army Europe commander, expressed his condolences Wednesday following a bridge-crossing exercise in Chelmno, where he told reporters of the incident.

Four Army vehicles from the 18th Combat Sustainment Support Battalion, 16th Sustainment Brigade were involved in a collision with a civilian vehicle containing two passengers, a service statement reads. The vehicles were entering highway A18 near Świętoszów, Lubuskie. The Army vehicles were traveling to Torun as part of Poland's military exercise Anakonda 16, in which the US Army is playing a major role.

The passenger in the car was killed and the driver was taken to a hospital in Boleslawiec, according to the Army. No US soldiers were injured but the vehicle involved in the crash was unable to continue with the convoy.

"The safety of the local population and all Exercise Anakonda participants is of utmost importance. The priority is to ensure the well-being of those involved and ensure compliance with local laws and law enforcement officials," the Army statement said.

Polish and US agencies are investigating the cause of the incident and therefore Army officials would not comment on the details of the accident.

Anakonda is a multinational exercise involving around 31,000 soldiers from 23 countries and including about 3,000 vehicles. The exercise started Monday and will continue through June 17.

Email: jjudson@defensenews.com

Twitter: @JenJudson

Jen Judson is the land warfare reporter for Defense News. She has covered defense in the Washington area for 10 years. She was previously a reporter at Politico and Inside Defense. She won the National Press Club's best analytical reporting award in 2014 and was named the Defense Media Awards' best young defense journalist in 2018.

Share:
More In Road To Warsaw
Why NATO Didn't Fly Its Flag at Anakonda
As troops from 24 nations convened last month in Poland for exercise Anakonda, some European countries successfully worked behind the scenes to soften the symbolism of ground troops maneuvering so closely to Moscow’s backyard.
Obama Downplays Brexit Impact at NATO Summit
NATO leaders will approve rotating four battalions through Poland, Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania, up to 4,000 troops in all, as a collective tripwire against fresh Russian adventurism in its old stomping ground.