WASHINGTON — Northrop Grumman is splitting its Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems division in two, a move the company says will allow it to focus on its space and airborne ISR business.

The defense giant announced the restructuring Monday, with its ISR&TS division becoming two new entities: Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance Reconnaissance and Targeting Systems, and Space Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance Systems.

"This strategic realignment of our ISR business activities will better position the company for a broad and exciting portfolio of future growth opportunities in both the airborne and space domains," said Gloria A. Flach, corporate vice president and president, Northrop Grumman Electronic Systems, in a prepared statement.

"Ensuring the success of our airborne and space ISR customers' programs is of critical importance to the nation and the company. Both of these divisions will continue our imperative to enhance future performance, innovation and affordability for our customers."

Earlier this year, Tom Vice, Northrop's president of aerospace, identified three core areas for Northrop's aerospace division: manned aircraft, autonomous systems and space systems.

"For us, we remain disciplined on these three areas because we see the opportunities, and we see the experiences we have, the capabilities we have, the technology we have," Vice said at the time. "We don't need to venture out of that and look for adjacencies. These markets are where we're going to focus."

100211-N-2013O-003 YOKOSUKA, Japan (Feb. 11, 2010) Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Shawn Sutphin, from Norfolk, examines a Navy Working Uniform eight point cover in the Fleet Exchange at Fleet Activities Yokosuka. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Charles Oki/Released)
100211-N-2013O-003 YOKOSUKA, Japan (Feb. 11, 2010) Interior Communications Electrician 1st Class Shawn Sutphin, from Norfolk, examines a Navy Working Uniform eight point cover in the Fleet Exchange at Fleet Activities Yokosuka. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Charles Oki/Released)

Last year, in anticipation of expanding its space business, Northrop began building its $20 million Maryland Space Assembly and Test facility at its Linthicum engineering and manufacturing complex.

Twitter: @andclev