Watch the U.S. Navy ship Gabrielle Giffords fire a Naval Strike Missile during an exercise in the Pacific.

WASHINGTON — The U.S. State Department on Friday approved the potential sale of Naval Strike Missile Coastal Defense Systems to Romania, in a deal that could be worth about $300 million.

The Naval Strike Missile is a sea-skimming, over-the-horizon anti-ship missile that has limited, built-in target recognition capabilities. Romania wants to buy two of the systems, according to an announcement on the website of the Defense Security Cooperation Agency.

“The proposed sale will improve Romania’s capability to meet current and future threats by improving Romania’s maritime defense capabilities in the Black Sea and increasing interoperability with the United States,” the DSCA announcement read. “Romania will use this long-range, precision strike weapon to enhance mission effectiveness, survivability, and NATO interoperability in current and future missions and operations.”

Included in the proposed package are up to 10 Link 16 Multifunctional Information Distribution System-Joint Tactical Radio Systems, two Coastal Defense System Fire Distribution Centers, four Mobile Launch Vehicles, Transport Loading Vehicles and the missiles themselves, as well as other equipment.

Work would primarily be completed at Raytheon’s Tucson, Arizona, facility.

DSCA announcements do not represent final sales. If there is no congressional objection, the customer can begin negotiating over price and quantities, which often change by the time a final sale is completed.

This is the first Foreign Military Sale request cleared by the State Department for Romania since 2017.

Aaron Mehta was deputy editor and senior Pentagon correspondent for Defense News, covering policy, strategy and acquisition at the highest levels of the Defense Department and its international partners.

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